Rollicking Entertainment presents The Dunstan Creek Haunting

Whether you are a believer or a skeptic, there’s something eerie about a ghost story that’s based on real-life events. The Dunstan Creek Haunting explores the spooky happenings that took place in St Bathans, Central Otago (formerly known as Dunstan Creek) during the gold rush era which is reportedly the most haunted region in New Zealand.

Dave and Lizzie are keen paranormal investigators whose appetite for the supernatural lead them to dig deeper into this former mining town with a dark past. They present to us their findings in the form of a series of slides with the main focus of their discourse being the Vulcan Hotel which hosts the town’s most famous ghostly resident, Rose McKendry.

The show’s synopsis and publicity make it no secret that there is more to expect than just visual aids and reenactments, that the performers’ affable disposition and jovial banter is really a red herring to mislead us. Slowly but surely we get a sense there is something sinister lurking underneath the surface; not knowing when and how things are going to unravel is what keeps the audience on edge.

The narrative turns on its head when a chilling presence disrupts the proceedings prompting the space to quite literally come to life through clever staging and well thought out trickery. The timing is pitch perfect  and paced effectively to create an increasingly tense and unsettling atmosphere. There is a very palpable air of dread and foreboding among the audience which Dave and Lizzie skilfully harness and build on until the most heart-pounding, thrilling conclusion.

Part seminar, part séance and full on nerve-wrecking, The Dunstan Creek Haunting is a terrifyingly excellent take on the horror theatre genre. It is brilliantly crafted and thoughtfully designed to be a genuinely harrowing experience that is sure to unnerve even the biggest of cynics.

The Dunstan Creek Haunting is at the Herald Theatre until 31st October. For more details and to book tickets, click here.

Advertisements

Carbolic Productions: The Revue 2017 – Last Call

What happens when you put an army of young working professionals together and allow them to use the stage as their creative outlet? For those not already in the know, The Revue is an annual artistic get-together by Carbolic Productions very akin to popular comedy variety show Saturday Night Live.

Last Call is another jam-packed program featuring a fun and facetious smorgasbord of skits, jokes, videos, live music, dance and even the odd informercial thrown in for good measure. This year’s shindig has been set up to be the ‘best party in town’ and for the most part, they do deliver the goods.

The main over-arching storyline centres around a group of friends at the aftermath of a party which feels much like the premise of Hollywood flick The Hangover. Interspersed between their piecing together the night before and the lineup of short sketches, the audience are also treated to tunes by Revue house band “The Look”.

From hilarious puns and comic one-liners to silent film mimicry and satirical musical numbers, there is a little something for everyone. Particularly enjoyable and impressive was the hip hop performance near the end of act one – judging by the applause that was the clear crowd favorite of the night.

With such a massive cast and the narrative made up of so many varying vignettes there are a lot of moving cogs in this show. It is no surprise then that it requires a band of directors to pull the whole thing together and credit must be given to Shuchi Ghosh, Alysha Jensen and Shawn Moodie for managing to bring such a massive operation to the stage.

There are some solid comedic gems but there were also some misses.  The main plot point didn’t feel altogether necessary while the format of this style of show unavoidably involved a lot of fading in and out and logistical activity which did feel quite distracting. The infectious energy of the cast does somewhat make up for it and the inclusion of the band in the proceedings was definitely a welcome break as well.

The Revue 2017: Last Call is an entertaining albeit mixed bag but with such an eclectic selection on offer, there will be something to tickle everyone’s funny bone. For a night out at the theatre that offers something a little different, give this a go.

Check out Carbolic Productions to find out more about this project and follow them to be in the know about next year’s Revue.

 

 

Dark Lake: A Hunted Interactive Experience

Theatre is all about escapism – a good work should transport you, incite emotion and hopefully resonate in your memory. This interactive walkthrough play, likened to an Edgar Allen Poe story, certainly ticks all these boxes.

Dark Lake is a unique, horror-themed theatrical offering where there is no stage or seats and the Fourth Wall between performer and audience member doesn’t exist. Set outdoors at nightfall with staggered start times that only allow for a small group each time, it gives the audience a whole different, thrilling way to experience theatre.

Just as it requires a level of daring to attend this play, it takes guts – and skill – to put on a production like this as in the wrong hands it could teeter towards the style over substance territory. Thankfully the Hunted team are not amateurs in this game and it shows.

A premise like this relies heavily on creating an environment that is not overly orchestrated so it allows the audience to suspend their disbelief and invest in the story. The company have achieved this brilliantly along with building and maintaining a palpable ominous feeling in the air. Familiar ground take on a more sinister quality in the dark and as there is no stage, the parameters of the performance space have been completely redefined. As the story progresses, there is a very real sense of dread and you constantly find yourself looking in all directions in anticipation for what’s next.

What really sets this apart from your standard theatre piece is the interactive aspect. The experience is set up so that you are meant to engage with what’s happening and while you can be as involved as you want to be, you also should be prepared to do what is required to proceed. The narrative evolves organically depending on how you as a group choose to act and react as things unfold which keeps things unpredictable and malleable.

While the characters you encounter on the journey are interesting and disturbing in equal measure, there is room to delve deeper to give this macabre story more depth. Similar can be said about the puzzles peppered along the way – more of these would have upped the stakes and enhanced the narrative. The experience is considerably short so there is definitely potential to push the envelope further and increase the eerie factor that bit more.

Dark Lake is a well crafted, thoroughly unsettling and chillingly atmospheric experience that will have you on edge from start to finish. It is not for everyone but if you can brave it, this is an unforgettable, visceral experience that challenges the boundaries of what theatre could be and where it can go.

Dark Lake is in multiple cities across New Zealand. The exact location is secret and will be emailed to you once you have booked tickets. Most dates are already sold out so get in quick! For dates and more details, click here.

Adrian Bohm Presents: Kevin Bridges

Kevin Bridges is a household name on the international comedy circuit and really needs no introduction especially if you are a fan of UK comedy. This is his New Zealand debut and judging by the fact there was enough demand to put on a second show in Auckland (to his surprise), hopefully this bodes well for Aotearoa to be included in future tours.

After a quick poll it is evident the audience is unsurprisingly largely made up of expats and while Bridges does play to this crowd he does so in a way that doesn’t exclude the rest. His material is well written, bitingly topical and rich with witty observations. From his thoughts on Trump to his amusement at the latest food trend of pulling everything, he garnered laughs effortlessly.

Bridges’ thick Scottish brogue does require a bit of tuning in to initially and he even opens the show acknowledging this, poking fun at commonly not being understood, to hilarious effect. Even with this in mind, his conversational style of stand up means the show is easily enjoyable and accessible.

Bridges takes to the stage with an air of confidence and swag that only comes with someone of his caliber. Even when the energy dips near the tail-end, it doesn’t seem to faze him and with so many laughs already had, the lull is easily shrugged away.

Throughout the show, Bridges engages in quite a bit of banter with the crowd with a select few singled out and getting regular mention which make for a very communal experience. Hecklers beware: he takes no prisoners and though there is a thin layer of arrogance in how he deals with them, it is highly warranted and you can’t help but be impressed.

There is something quite satisfying about going to see an accomplished, really good comedian just work his magic. Kevin Bridges is a seasoned pro that should be on every comedy aficionado’s must-see list.

Kevin Bridges New Zealand tour was short and sweet but hopefully he will be back on our shores again soon enough! To find out where he is performing next, click here.

Dominion Rd The Musical – The Heart of the City

Musicals have that wonderful ability to give life’s topical issues new light simply by putting a melodic spin on it. This developmental work by accomplished art practitioners Renee Liang and Jun Bin Lee does exactly that to brilliant effect.

Dominion Rd The Musical not only delights in the rich history and diversity of this iconic road in Auckland but it also celebrates the musical genre itself. From the catchy opening chorus number to its archetypal narrative structure, it bears all the hallmark tropes of what we all know and love in a musical.

The story follows the lives of various residents and shopkeepers on Dominion Road and their subsequent reactions when city councillor Stevie (portrayed by Brady Peetie with charming bravado) proposes to rebrand the street as Auckland’s Chinatown. The set is effectively minimal; adorning the stage are four large sandwich boards with stills of real-life shopfronts – a clever way to represent the street – which coupled with well-choreographed cast members playing buskers and passersby, suitably transport us to the hustle and bustle of Dominion Road.

The cast is fairly big in number, as to be expected, and wonderfully diverse which is not usually expected so was a joy to see. The five main characters are well cast, each with a different story to tell; particularly enjoyable are neighbouring proprietors Alison and Ahmad (played superbly by Jackie Clarke and Mustaq Missouri) whose animosity towards each other provide great comic relief.

Marissa Holder’s Geeta is the classic likeable protagonist who seeks to bring the community together to curb the rebranding with the help of her best-guy-friend-potential-boyfriend Terry depicted earnestly by Benjamin Teh. These two characters were the most interesting in terms of their backstory so much so that the will they/won’t they romance felt a bit out of place and almost unnecessary.

There is plenty of music to enjoy with a generous song list and varied repertoire of styles and arrangements all of which are performed excellently by the five leads and chorus. From fetching crowd numbers to droll duets and stirring solos, there is something for everybody. Liang and Lee are a dynamic duo; together they have created a fabulous tapestry of songs that wonderfully encapsulate the colourful and eclectic nature of Dominion Road.

What makes this work truly special is how intrinsically New Zealand it is. It is unequivocally a musical just as it is unquestionably a New Zealand story. More importantly it reflects the melting pot of cultures in which we live in today – something that is not showcased all too often, particularly in musicals. It may possibly not resonate quite as much to a wider audience outside of New Zealand however it is still an important story to tell.

Dominion Rd The Musical is a discerningly crafted, easily enjoyable symphony of sound celebrating all that is uniquely wonderful about Dominion Road and, in a broader sense, living in Aotearoa. It brilliantly fuses political and musical together resulting in a delightful work that is feel-good and thought-provoking, uplifting and heartwarming.

Dominion Rd The Musical is on at the Playhouse Theatre on 15 Glendale Road in Glen Eden until 19 August. For more details and to book tickets, click here.

NZICF 2017: Urzila Carlson – Studies Have Shown

South African Urzila Carlson, who has called NZ home for 11 years now, is a national treasure and no stranger to the local comedy circuit. This year’s offering brings more of her trademark straight talk and conversational style of stand up which Kiwi audiences have come to know and love.

Studies Have Shown sees Carlson poke fun at the silly studies and strange surveys that are being carried out online and beyond while also providing suggestions of alternate topics for research. A range of subject matters are covered from what researchers have to say about pets to her personal approach to parenting.

Carlson’s engaging delivery coupled with her conversable and laidback demeanor make for an easily enjoyable show. Her ability to highlight the hilarity in everyday predicaments and scenarios – like which is the best toilet cubicle to occupy? – feels so effortless which illustrates her seasoned comic chops.

While her findings were fascinating and often eye-opening, it is Carlson’s suggestions for what we should be focused on instead that is the driving comedic force of the narrative. From a hilarious anecdote about the worst time for your keys to fail on you to a facetiously contentious spiel around how being vegetarian doesn’t help the planet, her material had solid entertainment value.

Studies Have Shown is frequently funny, incredibly accessible and brilliantly combines topical with comical to entertaining effect. It is another superb offering from Urzila Carlson that is guaranteed to tickle your funny bone.

Urzila Carlson has finished her run at the Comedy Festival but will now be taking this show on a nationwide tour. For dates, locations and to book tickets, click here.

NZICF 2017: Luke Callaghan – Born in the US, Eh?

Having grown up in the US and having lived in NZ for the past 12 years, Luke Callaghan considers both home and consequently his comedy has an interesting dichotomy to it. Born in the US, Eh? sees him examine the hallmarks of these two countries through both American and Kiwi lenses.

Callaghan is off to a great start with his observations on NZ’s favorite snacks and spreads followed by the ridiculously excessive menu items offered at family restaurants in America. His thoughts on the great culture war that is marmite versus vegemite and why he doesn’t trust Weet-Bix are hilariously spot on.

The rest of the show continues in this fashion with Callaghan seamlessly finding the funny in a range of topics spanning from pet food to pot. Though he has an indisputable American twang he regularly reminds us that he doesn’t meet any of the usual stereotypes which is another recurring talking point in the narrative.

Callaghan pokes fun at the oddities of both his home countries to humorous effect, like mocking America’s advertising tactics and pointing out the illogicality of finding a flatmate via TradMe. He delivers these from the perspective of both a native and outsider looking in which gives his material quite an intriguing quality and aptly mirror his duality of identity.

Born in the US, Eh? is a cleverly written and commendable debut solo show from Luke Callaghan. His keen and insightful observations coupled with his affinity with both NZ and US come together in a comedic collision of cultures that is incredibly engaging and easily enjoyable.

Luke Callaghan is performing this show one more time this evening at the Backbeat Bar on 100 K road. For more details and to book tickets, click here.