Zanetti Productions: Medusa

This is Medusa as you’ve never seen before. There is no creature with a head of snakes instead the rage that embodies this character unravels before our eyes in a vivid and visceral tapestry of spoken word, light and sound.

Nisha Madhan, Julia Croft and Bronwyn Ensor collectively “play” this mythological monster and they do so like a well-oiled machine. The piece starts in complete silence bar a few awkward sniggers and shuffling before evolving, coming alive and eventually going the other extreme in a defiantly discordant way.

We are taken on an erratic journey where any notion of a conventional narrative is completely dismantled. Things get chaotic, raucously loud, uncomfortable, raw, unsettling yet oddly hypnotic. The lighting design and soundscape are like characters in their own right, adding a visual and aural layer to the cacophony of words.

Medusa is an assertive assault to the senses, reminding you of the power of theatre. Postmodern in its approach, it will not be for everyone but for those who take the chance, it is a bold beast that will affect and bewilder as well as challenge your ideas on femininity.

Medusa is part of Q Theatre’s Matchbox 2018 season and is on upstairs in the Loft until 3 November. For more details and to book tickets, click here.

Advertisements

Proudly Asian Theatre: Orientation

Love and sexuality are complicated enough to navigate without adding race in to the mix. Orientation is a bold new work by Proudly Asian Theatre that explores what it means to be Asian in Aotearoa, dissecting in particular common stereotypes associated with sex and relationships.

Mei, the central character of the story, finds herself battling an identity crisis being half Pākehā and half Chinese yet only having dated white men. Enlisting the help of the ‘Asian Everyman’, she goes on a quest – to “root herself back to her roots”. As she speed dates her way through various suitors, we are given a superficial representation of “Asianess” which will no doubt speak to and resonate more to those of Asian descent in the crowd.

This audacious way of self discovery is certainly unorthodox but paves the way to the bigger subject matter at hand – the racism and social conditioning that is deeply ingrained into the fabric of New Zealand society. From dumplings and that iconic lucky cat to throwing around popular prejudice and cringe-worthy clichés, playwright and director Chye-Ling Huang’s script is unabashedly honest as it is deeply perceptive.

Where this piece falters ever so slightly is in its over ambition and pace. While what is being presented is compelling, the overall narrative could have benefited from being tighter, focusing on a select few talking points rather than a whole slew – though perhaps this was the intent. Regardless things did drag in parts and at times felt on the over-indulgent side.

All in all Orientation packs a punch. It is an edgy and thought-provoking theatre piece that uses one woman’s mission to find her place as the beacon that casts a light on Asian sexuality and the racial undercurrents that exists in this country.

Orientation is on at Q Theatre until 15 May as part of the MATCHBOX 2018 season. For more info and to book tickets, click here.

Indian Ink Theatre Company: Mrs Krishnan’s Party

Indian Ink Theatre Company are renowned for their innovative and visual storytelling with Mrs Krishnan’s Party delivering just that and more. Taking place in the back room of the titular character’s dairy, it centres around recreating Onam, the annual harvest festival of Kerala which celebrates life, death and rebirth.

The party atmosphere is pulled off brilliantly with the use of theatre in the round style seating. Performance and audience spaces are very much blurred with no Fourth Wall in sight as audience members are engaged in conversation and invited to participate. The different tiers of tickets allows attendees to be as involved as they want to, very much mirroring what would happen at an actual party.

Aspiring DJ James played with charming aplomb by Justin Rogers is the amiable host of the festivities who is intent on bringing us together for a merry affair that’s like “Christmas, Easter, and Diwali all rolled into one”. Colourful scarves are passed around and bindis donned before the imminent arrival of the assertive yet endearing Mrs Krishnan herself portrayed superbly by Kalyani Nagarajan.

A highlight of this festive gathering is watching a pot of dahl come together live before our eyes. Just like how the flavours of a curry build over time, the depth of both these characters develop (and unravel) as the narrative unfolds. The journey their characters go on parallels the heart of Onam and the Hindu mythology that surrounds it.

Mrs Krishnan’s Party is another solid offering from Indian Ink Theatre Company that is a heartwarming recipe of culture, folklore, dance and cookery. It is a fun, feel-good, multi-sensory theatrical soiree that uses interactive theatre – and food – to bring everyone together.

The season at Q has finished but the company are taking the show to Wellington and Christchurch next. For more info and to book tickets, click here.